BIS: the Open storage

Materials which owners granted access to them for all other BIS users are placed in the “Open storage” section.

How to share material for all BIS users

Attention! The shared material becomes available to all BIS users. Sharing your materials you agree to their distribution under a Creative Commons license.

  1. Sign in your account on the BIS website.
  2. Switch to the “Node Groups (Object)” section.
  3. For the material you want to share, click the “Share” button.

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BIS: How to start

Welcome to “BIS” (Blender Interplanety Storage) – a service for downloading, storing, management and sharing materials for the Blender 3D suite.

Introducing to BIS:

  1. Create a personal account:

Open the BIS website https://bis.interplanety.org/ in your favorite browser:

Press the “Sign up” button.

Fill in the “Login” and “Password” fields. Please specify an active email address. On the checkbox that confirms your acceptance of the User Agreement.

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Learning loops

In general, the “loop” is usually a sequential selection of several points, edges or polygons of a mesh.

However, there is an element in the mesh structure, which is also called a “loop”. It is a combination of one vertex with one edge of the mesh. Let’s try to learn what these “loops” are for.

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How to pass command line arguments to a Blender python script or add-on

When starting Blender from the console it processes all parameters passed through the command line. However, some scripts and add-ons for proper work may require specifying their unique command line arguments. If you specify such additional parameters in the command line, Blender will also try to process them, which is likely to result in an error. Blender provides a special way to exclude such arguments from own processing.

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Creating radio buttons in the Blender add-ons interface

State switches so-called “radio buttons” are used in the case to limit the choice by one value from several available ones. There are a lot of such buttons in the Blender interface, for example, switching between RGB and BW rendering modes or setting the texture mapping mode. Such buttons can be created in the Blender add-ons interface too.

Let’s create our own radio button switcher.

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How to programmatically check if the operator is registered in Blender API

Single add-on or script can contain several different operators, and not all of them may be registered in the API by the register() function. To verify that the required operator is registered in the Blender API, run the following command:

Where:

_operator_bl_idname_ – the text value of the bl_idname operator property.

For example for an operator:

the command will look like this:

 

How to programmatically check if the Blender add-on is registered

To start working every Blender add-on must be registered by setting up the checkbox before add-on name in the User Preferences window – Add-ons page.

To programmatically find out if the required add-on is registered, run the following command:

Where:

add-on_name – the name of the add-on file (without the .py extension) or the name of the add-on package, if it was installed from the package.